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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  May 24, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. now, this is outside source. the uk government is unde pressure now, the uk government is under pressure on several fronts, notjust to do with those lockdown parties, also on the cost of living. millions more households now know they face further hardship as energy bills are set for another significant rise later in the year. on afghanistan, uk's withdraws described by mps as a disaster which will damage uk interests for years to come. and with westminster plays for the release of that sue gray report on the lockdown parties, the bbc has had the accounts of some people who were there and saw the prime minister. he were there and saw the prime minister. . , �* ,_ minister. he wasn't there saying this shouldn't _ minister. he wasn't there saying this shouldn't be _ minister. he wasn't there saying this shouldn't be happening, -
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minister. he wasn't there saying this shouldn't be happening, he| this shouldn't be happening, he wasn't saying can everyone break up and go home because my cable and socially distance? and everyone put masks on? no, he wasn't telling anybody that. he was grabbing a glass for himself. pressure coming on the uk government from a number of fronts more detail has emerged about the lockdown parties in number 10. there's confirmation energy prices will rise sharply later year as the cost of living crisis deepens. and an inquiry by mps has concluded that that the uk's withdrawal from afghanistan last year was a "disaster". we're going to look at all three across this first half an hour. let's begin with the parties because, for the first time, insiders who were at some of the events have talked in detail about what they saw. they've been talking to the bbc�*s laura kuennsberg and in this clip a staffer described the culture in noio during at the time. they were every week. the event
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invites for a friday press office strengths were just nailed into the diary. strengths were 'ust nailed into the dia . ., , , diary. there were actually invites. there was a _ diary. there were actually invites. there was a weekly _ diary. there were actually invites. there was a weekly regular - diary. there were actually invites. there was a weekly regular invite | diary. there were actually invites. l there was a weekly regular invite to press office strengths on friday nights? press office strengths on friday niuhts? , ., , nights? yes, one time fridays, invites iran _ nights? yes, one time fridays, invites iran everyone's - nights? yes, one time fridays, | invites iran everyone's calendar nights? yes, one time fridays, - invites iran everyone's calendar for every friday at four p:m.. four o'clock every friday at four p:m.. four o'clock in _ every friday at four p:m.. four o'clock in the _ every friday at four p:m.. four o'clock in the afternoon - every friday at four p:m.. four o'clock in the afternoon was i every friday at four p:m.. four o'clock in the afternoon was wind time? , and drinking wasn't limited to wine time fridays. here is another staffer describing turning up to work. what was it like sometimes the morning after? es, what was it like sometimes the morning after?— what was it like sometimes the morning after? a max. there were bottles, empties, _ morning after? a max. there were bottles, empties, rubbish, - morning after? a max. there were bottles, empties, rubbish, in - morning after? a max. there were bottles, empties, rubbish, in the l bottles, empties, rubbish, in the band, but overflowing, or indeed sometimes left on the table. he would no sometimes left on the table. he would go into work in the morning and 10 downing street and find empty bottles littered around the place? yeah. two of the people who spoke to the bbc have been fined for attending these events. and remember it's believed 10 downing street has more covid fines connected to it than any other address in the country.
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police issued more than 100 fines some relating to downing street some to other whitehall offices borisjohnson was one of those fined. and laura kuennsberg has heard about the prime minister's role at these gatherings too. he was there. he may have just been pepping he was there. he may have just been popping through on the way to his flat, because that's what would happen. you know, he wasn't there" this shouldn't happen in to my cable and break up and go home? " "can everyone socially distance? and everyone put masks on? " no, he wasn't telling anybody that. he was grabbing a glass for himself. and now there are photos of borisjohnson doing what appears to be just that. this is borisjohnson at a leaving do in downing street. he has a drink in hand and he's standing behind a table with several bottles of alcohol and food. it's 13th november 2020. the uk was in a strict lockdown. here's another he appears to be raising his glass in a toast.
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there are four of these photos. we know this was a leaving do for lee cain borisjohnson�*s then communications director. and we heard from one staffer what that do was like. there was about 30 people, if not more, in a room. everyone with stood shoulder to shoulder. some people on each other�*s lapse. shoulder to shoulder. some people on each other's lapse.— each other's lapse. people were sittin: at each other's lapse. people were sitting at each _ each other's lapse. people were sitting at each other's _ each other's lapse. people were sitting at each other's labs? - each other's lapse. people were l sitting at each other's labs? yes, one or two _ sitting at each other's labs? yes, one or two people. _ we also know at least one person was fined for attending that event. borisjohnson was not. laura kuennsberg described conversations about that with some staffers. i think there's a sense of injustice among some of them, and i think that's been exacerbated by what's happened about that party that boris johnson was pictured at yesterday. they do not necessarily feel that the consequences are playing out in an equal way. so there's that issue
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of whether it was fair that boris johnson was not fined. and there's another issue here. nearly a month after that leaving do, in parliament, a labour mp asked borisjohnson about an event on the exact date. will the prime minister tell the house whether there was a party in downing street on the 13th of november? mr downing street on the 13th of november?— downing street on the 13th of november? ~ .,~ ., , downing street on the 13th of november? ~ ., , �* november? mr speaker, no, but i'm sure whatever _ november? mr speaker, no, but i'm sure whatever happened, _ november? mr speaker, no, but i'm sure whatever happened, the - november? mr speaker, no, but i'm l sure whatever happened, the guidance was followed and the rules were followed at all times. that exchange will likely be the focus of the next few days. that's because of the ministerial code, which says: ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. mrjohnson had previously told mps laws were not broken in downing street. and a staffer told laura kuenssberg how she and her colleagues reacted when they first heard that. so when you and your colleagues and government decide borisjohnson saying none of the rules have been broken... we
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saying none of the rules have been broken... ~ ., . saying none of the rules have been broken... ~ . . ., broken... we were watching it all live, and broken... we were watching it all live. and we _ broken... we were watching it all live, and we just _ broken... we were watching it all live, and we just sort _ broken... we were watching it all live, and we just sort of - broken... we were watching it all live, and we just sort of looked . broken... we were watching it all| live, and we just sort of looked at each other— live, and we just sort of looked at each other in disbelief, like "why? why is_ each other in disbelief, like "why? why is he — each other in disbelief, like "why? why is he denying that's? " when we have been_ why is he denying that's? " when we have been within this entire time. we knew— have been within this entire time. we knew the rules had been broken. we knew_ we knew the rules had been broken. we knew these parties happened. so staffers knew these parties happened but borisjohnson has maintained he wasn't aware rules were being broken. even though he was making those rules. let's get more from our uk political correspondent rob watson pm reply, we need at the publication of the sue gray report would be an important moment for borisjohnson, important moment for boris johnson, but important moment for borisjohnson, but it seems even the run—up to the report is worthy of that description.— report is worthy of that descri tion. , ~ , description. yes, the prime minister has received — description. yes, the prime minister has received what _ description. yes, the prime minister has received what you _ description. yes, the prime minister has received what you might - description. yes, the prime minister has received what you might call - description. yes, the prime minister has received what you might call a l has received what you might call a double whammy, a double whammy in the sense that first of all, you have those photos from colleagues on itv, and then of course, you have the testimony that our colleague has
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produced, i think the problem there is that if you stick it altogether, it is very hard to square that with the prime minister telling parliament on a number of occasions that there were no parties and that no rules were broken. in many ways, actually, i think that's perhaps a bigger threat to the prime minister van public opinion, the sort of possibility have mps finding that he had indeed misled parliament. star; had indeed misled parliament. stay with us, had indeed misled parliament. stay with us. we — had indeed misled parliament. stay with us, we will— had indeed misled parliament. stay with us, we will come back to you. let's look at what this means for borisjohnson now. let's bring up the ministerial code again. ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation, and here's where it gets more complicated to the prime minister. that obviously makes things difficult if it's the prime minister accused of doing this in the first place. that is the way the ministerial code works. and for now borisjohnson has made it clear he won't resign. the labour party says he should. and in april they called a vote which passed for a parliamentary
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iniquiry into claims mrjohnson misled mps. let's hear labour's reaction to the today's news. we cannot live in a country where our allies do not apply to everyone, whoever you are. and there is a whiff today that if you are the prime minister, if you have an elite background, you canjust brush prime minister, if you have an elite background, you can just brush the stuff off, despite the fact that the british people were expected to make a very serious sacrifices indeed. so that's the view of the opposition. meanwhile, borisjohnson's allies have maintained he was at lee cain's leaving do in a work capacity. here's one government minister. he was coming out of his office carry the red boxes in, raised a glass to say thank you to a leading member of staff who he would have been working with closely all the way through, and then presumably left, and the police will have had all of that information, which is why they didn't issue him a fixed penalty notice in this case. and that defence has been
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echoed by his supporters. now let's look at other conservative mps. because his future as prime minister depends on their support too. rememberfor a conservative party leadership challenge, 5a tory mps must to submit a letter of no confidence in the prime minister. speaking on times radio this morning, tory mp tom tugendhat was asked if mrjohnson should be replaced. he said: "this is something i'm talking to colleagues about today." and all this is important because of what else is happening this week. the publication of the official report into these lockdown gatherings by civil servant sue gray. we've heard a number of tory mps say they're waiting on that to decide whether to submit letters. i guess that's why this report is such a crucial moment for the prime
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minister. ,~ ., such a crucial moment for the prime minister. ., ., ., ,, ., minister. eskimo and make it on the idea that perhaps _ minister. eskimo and make it on the idea that perhaps conservative - minister. eskimo and make it on the idea that perhaps conservative mps| idea that perhaps conservative mps will say whatever is in this report, maybe they want to wait and see what their fellow mps signed in another investigation that's going to follow this a great report into whoever the prime minister had misled parliament, so it may be that while tomorrow if that is indeed when this report comes out is hugely significant. it may not actually be decisive. , ., .., , decisive. one thing you can help me with ou, decisive. one thing you can help me with you. for — decisive. one thing you can help me with you, for all _ decisive. one thing you can help me with you, for all this _ decisive. one thing you can help me with you, for all this noise _ decisive. one thing you can help me with you, for all this noise and - decisive. one thing you can help me with you, for all this noise and the l with you, for all this noise and the upset as well, there is no evidence i've seen that the tory mps are ready to remotely turn on their leader. ., ., ., , ., leader. know, and i was wondering if ou are leader. know, and i was wondering if you are going — leader. know, and i was wondering if you are going to _ leader. know, and i was wondering if you are going to ask— leader. know, and i was wondering if you are going to ask me _ leader. know, and i was wondering if you are going to ask me about - leader. know, and i was wondering if you are going to ask me about that. l you are going to ask me about that. if you're going to be sort of scientific or base it on probability, you take the view that certainly until now, the majority of conservative mps have been prepared to stand by the prime minister at least not to want to replace him, so if the past is any guide to the future, you would think that perhaps
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whatever comes from this report, no matter how grisly it is, even if there are some more unpleasant photos, perhaps, as i say commit the past as a guide to the present, he will still be in hisjob despite having one hell of a battering. that is one thing — having one hell of a battering. that is one thing i— having one hell of a battering. that is one thing i want _ having one hell of a battering. that is one thing i want to ask you about, the cost of living crisis, because it is deepening in the uk. ofgem, the regulator that sets the price cap for how much energy firms can charge for electricity and gas, says it expects another big increase in october, ofgem said a uk household's typical energy bill could increase to £2,800 a year that's just over $3,500. that's a rise of around £800 or $1000. ofgem's chief executive jonathan brearley made the forecast to a committee of mps in parliament. i'm afraid to say conditions have worsened in the global gas markets to russia's invasion of ukraine. gas prices are higher and highly volatile. at times, they have now
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reached over ten times their normal level. now, i know this is a very distressing time for customers, but i do need to be clear with this committee with customers and with the government about the likely price implications for october. mr brearley described the increase in the price of gas as a "once in a generation event". the price cap has alreadyjumped massively once this year by £700 back in april. with that change, six and a half million households were in "fuel poverty" spending at least a tenth of their disposable income on energy. the ofgem boss was asked by the scottish national party mp alan brown, how that number might change. we are talking potentially 15 million households. the neck number we have, if you accept all the caveats, want even run through them, is around 12 million households. one thing i would say, just in addition to fact, you know, one of the most
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helpful but difficult parts of my job is talking to customers and feel poverty, which i do on a regular basis. we understand this is going to have a huge impact on households. this is a story that effects every household. here's one beth, from bristol. energy has skyrocketed. it is a big difference at that. over the summer, i think we will be ok because we just switch the energy totally, totally off of heating, it's this winter that will be a problem when the cap rises again, that's when we are going to struggle. the government announced £9.1 billion pounds of support to households back in march that's comprised of council tax and energy bill rebates, and through a scheme called the warm home discount. more recently the government has hinted, further measures are to come. here's our business editor, simonjack. the treasury has said that it stands ready to do more to help struggling
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households, but it wanted to see the size of the problem before it decided on the size of the solution. now we know, and there is renewed pressure on the government to deliver more supports. industry tells the bbc that they are expecting something as soon as this week. the question remains will the solution include a windfall tax on the profits of the companies that have profited as household incomes have seen their biggest cost of living squeeze since the 1950s? oil and gas companies have reported record profits over the obvious targets, but the government is also considering taxing other electricity generators that do not use fossil fuel to produce energy that have also gained from higher prices. the threat of a raid on older and renewable projects and it drew warnings it could shake investor confidence in new green technology. the government does not like the idea of a windfall tax but the reality of the situation may yet force a u—turn. simon jack, bbc news. those are options for the government, then there are questions about what can consumers do?
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conditions are so tough in the marketplace that shopping around is unlikely to result in savings. the website uswitch says those whose can afford it should invest in energy saving measures such as better insulation for their homes. the best advice, first of all, not to be panicking about this. so if you are struggling already, get in touch with your supplier as soon as possible, while at the moment there are deals to switch to at the moment, it is a time to actually start saving money on your energy at home. at the moment, because it's summer, this is the best time to do this. there are incentives that the government has already announced, and it would really, really save you money, autumn and come winter when the heating starts and you are using more energy. the heating starts and you are using more energy-— more energy. back to our political correspondent, _ more energy. back to our political correspondent, rob. _ more energy. back to our political correspondent, rob. i— more energy. back to our political correspondent, rob. iwas- more energy. back to our political i correspondent, rob. iwas surprised correspondent, rob. i was surprised when the regulator made this forecast. i wasn't expecting it at this point.
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forecast. i wasn't expecting it at this oint. ., forecast. i wasn't expecting it at this point-— this point. no, and i think the government— this point. no, and i think the government was _ this point. no, and i think the government was thinking - this point. no, and i think the government was thinking it i this point. no, and i think the i government was thinking it was this point. no, and i think the - government was thinking it was going to come more towards the end of the summer, the beginning of the autumn, but here is the thing. you have sort of laid it out nicely, the sort of dilemmas that the government is facing. you've laid out quite nicely the kind of awful problems facing consumers, to move on to my area, the politics of it all, quite interestingly, opinion polling suggests that it's not translating it into real problems for the government. now, but that is because people don't think that the opposition have any better ideas or whether it's because they blame rocketing prices on global factors such as ukraine, it is not clear, but for the time being, at least, the government isn't experiencing that sort of shock and the pulse. now, of course, that could change, and normally, of course, what happens is the government is in power, in this country or anywhere else in the world, they tend to get the blame and standards of living go plummeting and inflation is rocketing. plummeting and inflation is rocketing-—
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plummeting and inflation is rocketinu. ., ., , rocketing. you mention pollsters, let me show _ rocketing. you mention pollsters, let me show you _ rocketing. you mention pollsters, let me show you this _ rocketing. you mention pollsters, let me show you this quote - rocketing. you mention pollsters, let me show you this quote from | rocketing. you mention pollsters, - let me show you this quote from luke trail, talking to the times, who says the two subjects, the cost of living and predicate have become intertwined in the public mood, he goes on to say the public finds it hard to conceive how it sounds to me like your analysis doesn't quite square with that, for the moment, the electorate is getting boris johnson's the moment, the electorate is getting borisjohnson's government the benefit of the doubt. weill. the benefit of the doubt. well, certainly as — the benefit of the doubt. well, certainly as far _ the benefit of the doubt. well, certainly as far as _ the benefit of the doubt. well, certainly as far as party - the benefit of the doubt. well, certainly as far as party gate i the benefit of the doubt. well, certainly as far as party gate isj certainly as far as party gate is concerned, the polling suggests anecdotal evidence suggests that the country is split into two broad chunks, one chunkyjust think this is so shocking and it tells them everything that they always feared about borisjohnson as they are simply not fit for high office. the other chunk of the population thinks this is all of this is sort of grossly overdone, the people
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violated lockdown regulations and everybody needs to get on with it. i suspect that what happened over the last 2a hours or so won't really change that very much. as to the economic stuff, the cost of living, i mean, the puls at the moment still do suggest that while the opposition labour party does have something of a lead, there isn't some sort of great gaping gap or some sort of sense that the opposition has a clear alternative. sense that the opposition has a clearalternative. now, sense that the opposition has a clear alternative. now, again, that could change. irate clear alternative. now, again, that could change-— could change. we talked about the cost of living. _ could change. we talked about the cost of living, we _ could change. we talked about the cost of living, we talked _ could change. we talked about the cost of living, we talked about - could change. we talked about the cost of living, we talked about the | cost of living, we talked about the downing street parties and the fact that everyone is anticipating this sue gray report, let's talk about another source of pressure on price johnson's government, because an inquiry by mps have found the uk —— the inquiry by mps has found the uk's withdrawal from afghanistan last year was a "catastrophic failure" and a betrayal of britain's allies. the foreign affairs committee says there was a fundamental lack of planning or leadership before, and during, the taliban's takeover of kabul and that this "likely cost lives". their report calls for the
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resignation of the foreign office's top civil servant who stayed on holiday as kabulfell. our correspondent paul adams has this report. the west's withdrawal from kabul was chaotic and, for vast numbers of afghans desperate to leave, profoundly traumatic. it was also, mps say, a betrayal of britain's allies, a catastrophic failure of intelligence, diplomacy and planning. knowing that american forces were soon going to leave, the report says the government failed to respond. well, it's clear that what we could have done, really from 18 months out when the warning started, is begun the really serious preparations, knowing who we needed to evacuate, planning on how we would get them out and where we would take them, but instead i'm afraid that's not what happened. at a hearing last december, the foreign office's top civil servant struggled to explain why he and others, including the foreign secretary,
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stayed on holiday while kabulfell. i have reflected a lot since august on my leave, and if i had my time again i would have come back from my leave earlier. today's report suggests mr barton should consider his position. it says many of the british officials and soldiers sent to try and manage the terrible situation at kabul airport worked under enormous pressure. but it criticises what it calls misleading statements about the evacuation process, and says the leadership at the foreign office should be ashamed that two civil servants risked their careers to bring the situation to light. the foreign office defends its record. "our staff worked tirelessly," a spokesperson said, "to evacuate over 15,000 people from afghanistan within a fortnight. "this was the biggest uk mission of its kind in generations "and followed months of intensive planning and collaboration "between uk government departments." the report urges the government to commit to a serious strategy
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for dealing with afghanistan in the future. a failure to do that, it says, would abandon afghan women and girls to the biggest single reversal of rights in a generation. paul adams, bbc news. rob watson was watching that with us. it sounds like from their part that the criticism is more directed at the civil service than it is against the politicians. yes, but there is also. — against the politicians. yes, but there is also, or _ against the politicians. yes, but there is also, or there _ against the politicians. yes, but there is also, or there was - against the politicians. yes, but there is also, or there was also | there is also, or there was also criticism of the politicians. if we are nearing the end of our segment, it may well be worth to bring this all around to a great big generalised conclusion, and that is, you know, there are those in this country who think maybe things are about to go horribly wrong for the government, it would all come together, this sort of sense of whether it's afghanistan, whether it's an energy, whether it's it's an energy, whether its economy, brexit, standards of decency and government, all of this could come to a head and lead to the
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unraveling of borisjohnson and his government. set aside back, you have the version of the narrative that the version of the narrative that the government wants which is to say, "well, you know, and all the big causes, they would say boris johnson has got it right." so they say i'm cold and ukraine and on brexit. so there you have it. the start of two competing narratives of which way things could go in british politics, the sort of meltdown of the entire government of boris johnson's fortunes, or the prime minister through thick and thin. aha, minister through thick and thin. a practical question, do we know when sue gray will hand over her report for all of us to see? i sue gray will hand over her report for all of us to see?— for all of us to see? i only wish i knew. i can only _ for all of us to see? i only wish i knew. i can only tell— for all of us to see? i only wish i knew. i can only tell you - for all of us to see? i only wish i knew. i can only tell you that . for all of us to see? i only wish i | knew. i can only tell you that the politicaljournalism in westminster, everyone is basing it on the assumption that it will be sometime tomorrow that we will all scramble scramble. �* ., , ,., scramble. and i have seen some re orts scramble. and i have seen some reports the _ scramble. and i have seen some reports the prime _ scramble. and i have seen some reports the prime minister - scramble. and i have seen some reports the prime minister will l scramble. and i have seen somel reports the prime minister will do scramble. and i have seen some i reports the prime minister will do a press conference, is not confirmed,
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or again, are we waiting to know the choreography once the report is out? the latter. what he's always said is that when the report came out, he would make a statement to parliament, so i am absolutely sure that that is going to happen, whether that will be the added bonus, if you can call it that, of a news conference, i'm not quite sure. all right, thank you very much for helping us through those three stories. a reminder, we are expecting that report tomorrow, but that's not completely confirmed. we are, though, as rob said, reasonably sure that the prime minister will make a statement on the reports whenever it's released. i also want to mention, it is notjust boris johnson having to answer questions about lockdown breaches, let's have about lockdown breaches, let's have a look at this from argentina. president alberto fernandez has been caught up in his own partygate scandal. it's been revealed that he payed a $24,000 donation to stop an investigation into him breaking his rules during lockdown. the president and his wife came under investigation last year after this photo emerged showing the couple and around a dozen guests celebrating the first lady's birthday.
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the photo was taken in july 2020 when lockdown measures banned any public gatherings, including funerals. initially president fernandez downplayed the breach, saying it didn't count because nobody had caught covid. later he became more apologetic. saying he realised the birthday shouldn't have happened. he was sorry and it won't happen again. now, a judge has agreed to allow the case against president fernandez and his wife to be dropped, in exchange for three million pesos, that's $24,000. the money is equivalent to the cost of a respiratory machine and a stay in intensive care. it will go towards a vaccine research institution. now, just before we wrap up this half—hour some breaking news in the world of football. the premier league board has approved the proposed takeover of chelsea football club by a consortium led by the co—owner of the la dodgers
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baseball team. the takeover is where a £4.25 billion. we've got a statement from the primarily commits as chelsea fc will now work with the relevant governments to secure the necessary licenses to complete the takeover. if this goes through, it will bring to a close that 19 year ownership of the club. so, the primarily giving its stamp on that takeover as the premier league itself emphasises, though, those aren't all the hurdles that need to be cleared, so we will see how they play out in the coming days. you can get further coverage of that on the bbc sport website. by the way, if you would like further details of laura's report after she spoke to those in number 10 downing street staffers come he can find those in a number of different places to the bbc news website, bbc dot—coms flash news and third laura's twitter account, of course, and those of you in the uk, shortly you will be able to watch the addition of panorama
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via the bbc iplayer. i will see you in a couple of minutes. hello there. looking unsettled over the next few days. low pressure dominating the leather scene. towards the end of the become a high pressure will build and that will turn things a little bit drier with increasing amounts of sunshine. one of those unsettled days of sunshine and heavy showers, rumbles of thunder mixed into some of these showers, particularly to central and eastern parts of the country, though, there will be a few out west, there is a head that neck ridge of high pressure building in. some dry weather by the end of the day out west, the shower here, most of the showers for the east, those temperatures around the seasonal norm range. now, this evening and overnight commit turns dry for a while, for much of central and eastern parts of country, that ridge of high pressure common area of low pressure starts to push into the
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west so some drier weather by the end of the day out west, the odd shower here, most of the showers further east. those temperatures around the seasonal norm range from 13 to around 18 or 19 degrees. now, this evening and overnight, it turns dry for a while for much of central and eastern parts of the country and that ridge of high pressure, a new area of low pressure, starts to push into the west. that'll bring increasing wind cloud, outbreaks of rain, so milder out west though there will be further east one or two cool spots under the clearer skies. so this frontal system works its way from west to east across the country during wednesday, and you'll notice more isobars on the chart, so it's going to be a blustery day pretty much across the board. so we'll have that weather front, outbreaks of rain turning their way eastwards through the morning, eventually clearing into the afternoon to leave another day of sunshine and blustery showers. some of these will be heavy across the north and the west of scotland, but some good spells of sunshine in between in places. those temperatures again around the mid to high teens. so as we head into thursday, we've got low pressure to the north of the uk, higher pressure
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to the south, got this feature running through central parts of the country, through ireland, parts of northern england, the midlands and wales. that will clear away and we should see quite a bit of cloud around, i think, on thursday across england and wales, glimmers of brightness here and there, one or two showers. scotland, northern ireland will be another breezy day with sunshine and showers. some of these will be heavy across western scotland. again, the temperatures range from around 13 to 19 degrees. into friday, high pressure starts to push in from the southwest. in fact, it will bring quite a lot of dry weather around, i think, for much of southern scotland, northern ireland, much of england and wales, more sunshine across the south, so it'll feel warmer but still quite breezy across the north east of scotland. here we'll see further showers at times, temperatures around the low things turn a little bit cooler into the weekend. high pressure is dominating the scene, so it will be largely dry with some sunshine. we'll start to pick up a cooler northerly wind.
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i'm ros atkins with outside source. in this half hour, we will hear further details from china's detention centres where uighurs and other ethnic minorities are kept in detention centres. files have been passed to the bbc and reveal faces of those held in "re—education camps". i of those held in "re-education cams". . , of those held in "re-education cams". .,, ., of those held in "re-education cams". ., , camps". i was looking at these imaaes camps". i was looking at these images on _ camps". i was looking at these images on my _ camps". i was looking at these images on my laptop - camps". i was looking at these images on my laptop in - camps". i was looking at these images on my laptop in my - camps". i was looking at these i images on my laptop in my living room and had to get up, go somewhere else and take a break. i was overwhelmed. in else and take a break. i was overwhelmed.— else and take a break. i was overwhelmed. ~ ., ,, ., else and take a break. i was overwhelmed. ~' ., ,, ., overwhelmed. in ukraine, russia has t to overwhelmed. in ukraine, russia has try to surround _ overwhelmed. in ukraine, russia has try to surround it _ overwhelmed. in ukraine, russia has try to surround it two _ overwhelmed. in ukraine, russia has try to surround it two cities _ overwhelmed. in ukraine, russia has try to surround it two cities of - overwhelmed. in ukraine, russia has try to surround it two cities of the - try to surround it two cities of the country as a offensive reaches the three month mark. russia is accused
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of using food as a weapon in the war in ukraine. we will look at that issue in depth. we begin this half hour with a special report on china. a huge collection of data linked to china's treatment of uyghurs and other minorities has been handed to the bbc, including these photographs. they shed more light on china's highly secretive system of mass incarceration of uyghur people in the country's xinjiang region. the information was hacked from police computer servers, and it includes evidence of a shoot to kill policy for anyone who tried to escape. the foreign secretary liz truss has called the revelations shocking. here's our correspondent john sudworth. these are the faces china never intended us to see
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from inside its system of mass incarceration in xinjiang. the government has long denied it is running detention camps for uighurs, insisting instead they are vocational schools for willing students. the photos, almost 3,000 of them, show the reality of how whole swathes of uighur society have been swept up person by person. the oldest was 73 at the time of her detention, the youngest just 15. the uyghurs, with their turkic language, islamic traditions and roots in a region with a history of separatism and violence, have long faced cycles of tightening government control. singing and with mounting criticism over the camps, the authorities have taken journalists on tours, showing them uyghurs celebrating their culture and, they say, being guided away from extremism. but it's a narrative undermined by the tens of thousands of files passed to the bbc.
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one set of documents described the guarding of this camp just outside the city of kashgar, with armed police stationed at all the main buildings and with each watchtower guarded by two officers equipped with sniper rifles and machine guns. inside, lessons are watched over by police carrying shields, batons and handcuffs. and the documents describe the response to students who attempt to escape. if warning shots are ignored, the order is clear — shoot them dead. yes, this is classified, internal government information. the file, said to have been hacked from police computer servers in xinjiang by a source whose identity remains unknown, were first passed to dr adrian zamis, a xinjiang scholar, who in turn shared them with the bbc. you have police officers in heavy riot gear standing next to the men. some of the men have their arms in a funny position, as if they were handcuffed,
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so this is really very powerful image material. i was looking through these images on my laptop in the living room and i had to get up and go somewhere else and take a break. i was overwhelmed. the hacked files also contain hundreds of spreadsheets, row upon row of draconian jail sentences often targeting expressions of islamic faith, as a parallel method alongside the camps for detaining uyghurs en masse. just for growing a beard, this person was sentenced to 16 years injail, his chosen expression of uyghur identity forcibly removed. many others have been jailed for listening to "illegal religious lectures", including this couple. the documents don't say whether their daughters have been sent, like so many others, to the state—run boarding schools built alongside the camps. the data can be verified, shown to contain real people.
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abdulrahman hassan has not seen his wife and children since he left xinjiang in 2017, yet a search of the hacked files found this. a photo of his wife, sentenced, the documents say, to 16 years in prison for a vague offence that appears time and again — gathering a crowd to disturb the social order. "you can see how her spirit is broken," he tells me. mahmood toti knew his eldest son had beenjailed, but the database tells him for how long. 15 years for terrorism offences, although as evidence only his son's devout islamic faith is listed. the chinese foreign ministry spokesman responded to our reporting,
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describing it as simply the latest anti—china falsehood and an attempt to smear china with rumours and lies. "xinjiang is stable, prosperous and the people live happy lives," he said. but there's been no attempt to address the evidence itself, which includes these images from deep within the system, further evidence of the harsh detention and indoctrination of a people not for what they have done, but for who they are. john sudworth, bbc news. and i spoke tojohn about his work. this data comes from an anonymous source, who claims to have hacked into a number of police computer services in xinjiang. they passed information to a us—based academic, somebody who has long researched china's policies in xinjiang, dr
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adrian zenz, and a man very high—profile on this story, sanctioned by china as a result of the work he has done. and i think it is because of his prominence he was shown as the contact for this, and he shared with the bbc, believing it should be publicised but also the idea needed researching and authenticating, which is what we've spent the last few months doing. how have we done that? this is a huge amount of data, tens of thousands of files, photographs, documents, internal senior features from party officials, and spreadsheet data, row upon row of information about individuals, given their detention status, the reasons for their detention, their names, addresses and id numbers, and what we have
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done essentially is, first of all, try to establish whether this is information about real people. we have spoken to members of the uyghur diaspora, asking them for the names and id numbers of family members missing in xinjiang, and we have then run that information against this database and have been able to show, yes, this is information that contains real people. find show, yes, this is information that contains real people.— show, yes, this is information that contains real people. and john, you have repeatedly _ contains real people. and john, you have repeatedly reported _ contains real people. and john, you have repeatedly reported on - contains real people. and john, you have repeatedly reported on the - have repeatedly reported on the story. i wonder what you learned from this cache of documents you did not fully understand beforehand? that's a really interesting question. you're right. i was in china for nine years, i spent a lot of time covering the xinjiang story. it is one of the stories of important geopolitical sin of agains at the moment stop —— significance.
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china has long argued its policies and changing are designed to combat the threat of extremism and terrorism, in a part of the world that has a history of simmering sectors and some violence. the other evidence to date, of course, has raised the possibility that something far wider is going on, that what is really happening is this is china conflating that terrorist threat with uyghur identity itself, that expressions of uyghur culture and identity, loyalty to faith and family, is seen as problematic by china and that these camps and draconian prison centres are designed to try to break that aspect of uyghur identity and replace it with a loyalty to the communist party. that is a long way around of saying that, when i first saw these documents, i think it is fair to say we have had nothing of this quality and quantity before the gives it such a multilayered form,
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shape, to that process and to that purpose. let's turn to the war in ukraine now and russia's ongoing campaign to control the donbas area in the east. we've heard from the governor of luhansk region there. he says russian forces have been bombarding severodonetsk and lysychansk, two adjacent cities that they're trying to surround. the ukrainian president has issued this warning. translation: the most difficult situation is in _ translation: the most difficult situation is in the _ translation: the most difficult situation is in the donbas. - translation: the most difficult situation is in the donbas. they l situation is in the donbas. they want to limit everything that is alive. they want us to destroy the donbas like the russian troops are doing now. the knicks weeks of the world be difficult we have to be mindful of that —— the next weeks. but we have no alternative but to
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fight. we've also heard from the ukrainian foreign minister, who's urged the west to speed up its weapons deliveries. he says... and this is how one retired us admiral sees it. we have two strong—willed people, imprudent and also present zelensky, who does not want to give an inch. i think we're in for a long, difficult, slog in that part of the country —— in putin and also president zelensky. russia has better lines of communication, better lines of communication, better support. they continue to pound away with long—range weapons, so i think we are going to see this for a long time to come, so i think the losses and the damage are going to be very, very significant. well, the ukrainians say that bombardment of the region is getting worse,
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russia say they've actually slowed down. this is the russian defence minister. translation: cease fires have been declared and — translation: cease fires have been declared and humanitarian _ translation: cease fires have been declared and humanitarian corridors i declared and humanitarian corridors are being _ declared and humanitarian corridors are being created, inward to get people _ are being created, inward to get people out of the surrounded settlements. of course, this slows down _ settlements. of course, this slows down the _ settlements. of course, this slows down the pace of the offensive, but this is— down the pace of the offensive, but this is done — down the pace of the offensive, but this is done deliberately, to avoid casualties— this is done deliberately, to avoid casualties among the civilian population. for more on that russian offensive, here's our correspondent joe inwood in kyiv. the effort of the russians now is on encircling _ the effort of the russians now is on encircling these _ the effort of the russians now is on encircling these cities, _ the effort of the russians now is on encircling these cities, big - encircling these cities, big industrial— encircling these cities, big industrial cities, _ encircling these cities, big industrial cities, on - encircling these cities, big industrial cities, on either| encircling these cities, big - industrial cities, on either side of the severodonetsk— industrial cities, on either side of the severodonetsk river, - industrial cities, on either side of the severodonetsk river, and - industrial cities, on either side of| the severodonetsk river, and the industrial cities, on either side of- the severodonetsk river, and the way they are _ the severodonetsk river, and the way they are doing — the severodonetsk river, and the way they are doing that _ the severodonetsk river, and the way they are doing that is _ the severodonetsk river, and the way they are doing that is trying _ the severodonetsk river, and the way they are doing that is trying to - they are doing that is trying to pressure — they are doing that is trying to pressure several— they are doing that is trying to pressure several donetsk- they are doing that is trying to pressure several donetsk on i they are doing that is trying to - pressure several donetsk on three fronts _ pressure several donetsk on three fronts and — pressure several donetsk on three fronts and also _ pressure several donetsk on three fronts and also cut _ pressure several donetsk on three fronts and also cut off _ pressure several donetsk on three fronts and also cut off the - fronts and also cut off the supply lines. _ fronts and also cut off the supply lines. come _ fronts and also cut off the supply lines, come from _ fronts and also cut off the supply lines, come from the _ fronts and also cut off the supply lines, come from the south, - fronts and also cut off the supply lines, come from the south, and| lines, come from the south, and they're _ lines, come from the south, and they're having _ lines, come from the south, and they're having some _ lines, come from the south, and they're having some success - lines, come from the south, and i they're having some success doing that _ they're having some success doing that they— they're having some success doing that they have _ they're having some success doing that. they have recently, - they're having some success doing that. they have recently, we - that. they have recently, we understand, _ that. they have recently, we understand, burst _ that. they have recently, we understand, burst through i that. they have recently, we - understand, burst through some defences— understand, burst through some defences at— understand, burst through some defences at a _ understand, burst through some defences at a place, _ understand, burst through some defences at a place, some - understand, burst through some defences at a place, some frontl defences at a place, some front lines _ defences at a place, some front lines i _ defences at a place, some front lines i visited _
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defences at a place, some front lines i visited a _ defences at a place, some front lines i visited a few— defences at a place, some front lines i visited a few months - defences at a place, some fronti lines i visited a few months ago, incredibly— lines i visited a few months ago, incredibly well— lines i visited a few months ago, incredibly well dug _ lines i visited a few months ago, incredibly well dug in, _ lines i visited a few months ago, incredibly well dug in, so - lines i visited a few months ago, incredibly well dug in, so the - lines i visited a few months ago, | incredibly well dug in, so the fact they have — incredibly well dug in, so the fact they have got _ incredibly well dug in, so the fact they have got through _ incredibly well dug in, so the fact they have got through there - incredibly well dug in, so the fact they have got through there is i incredibly well dug in, so the fact they have got through there is a i they have got through there is a real success _ they have got through there is a real success for— they have got through there is a real success for the _ they have got through there is a real success for the russian - they have got through there is a i real success for the russian forces. what _ real success for the russian forces. what they— real success for the russian forces. what they are — real success for the russian forces. what they are going _ real success for the russian forces. what they are going to _ real success for the russian forces. what they are going to try- real success for the russian forces. what they are going to try to - real success for the russian forces. what they are going to try to do, i what they are going to try to do, encircle — what they are going to try to do, encircle them, _ what they are going to try to do, encircle them, cut _ what they are going to try to do, encircle them, cut off _ what they are going to try to do, encircle them, cut off the - what they are going to try to do, encircle them, cut off the supplyj encircle them, cut off the supply lines _ encircle them, cut off the supply lines and. — encircle them, cut off the supply linesand. in— encircle them, cut off the supply lines and, in the _ encircle them, cut off the supply lines and, in the words - encircle them, cut off the supply lines and, in the words of - encircle them, cut off the supply lines and, in the words of a - lines and, in the words of a prominent _ lines and, in the words of a prominent politician - lines and, in the words of a prominent politician here, i lines and, in the words of a - prominent politician here, create a new variable — prominent politician here, create a new variable - _ prominent politician here, create a new variable — basically _ prominent politician here, create a new variable — basically create - prominent politician here, create a new variable — basically create and use each _ new variable — basically create and use each in — new variable — basically create and use each in this _ new variable — basically create and use each in this part— new variable — basically create and use each in this part of— new variable — basically create and use each in this part of the - new variable — basically create and use each in this part of the country and basically— use each in this part of the country and basically start _ use each in this part of the country and basically start out _ use each in this part of the country and basically start out and - use each in this part of the country and basically start out and pound i and basically start out and pound with artillery _ and basically start out and pound with artillery the _ and basically start out and pound with artillery the ukrainian - with artillery the ukrainian defenders _ with artillery the ukrainian defenders that— with artillery the ukrainian defenders that are - with artillery the ukrainian defenders that are there i with artillery the ukrainian l defenders that are there —— with artillery the ukrainian i defenders that are there —— a with artillery the ukrainian - defenders that are there —— a new mayor— defenders that are there —— a new mayor you — “ new ina few in a few minutes, we will talk more about— in a few minutes, we will talk more about ukraine — in a few minutes, we will talk more about ukraine and _ in a few minutes, we will talk more about ukraine and the _ in a few minutes, we will talk more about ukraine and the food - in a few minutes, we will talk more about ukraine and the food crisis. i one of europe's largest infrastructure projects located in the uk has officially opened to passengers, with tens of thousands already taking their firstjourney. the new elizabeth line, which was also known as crossrail, runs 117 kilometres across london and into the suburbs. trains run underground through london, though some sections of it aren't yet in operation.
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it's named after the queen elizabeth, who officially opened the service a few days ago after 13 years of construction. the project has been delayed by about three and a half years and has gone about $5 billion over budget. our transport correspondent katy austin reports. good morning, everyone, and welcome to your brand—new elizabeth line service. these passengers at woolwich were among the first to board the elizabeth line this morning. just shorter travel for me, very convenient for me. been waiting nearly ten years for this thing to open. the journey time between i canary wharf and whitechapel is brilliant in my mind. the line links reading in berkshire with shenfield in essex via central london. it is initially running in three separate parts. from today the newly—built section between paddington and abbey wood will run monday to saturday with a train every five minutes. we are now on board one of the new trains that are up and running on the elizabeth line. they are pretty state—of—the—art and they are 200 metres long. each one can carry up to 1,500 passengers. the crossrail project is three and a half years late and over budget,
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but it is seen as a hugely impressive engineering achievement. crossrail, the elizabeth line, is a really important thing for us to be very proud of. but don't believe that it has gone down beautifully well in leeds, liverpool and manchester, where they want a share of the investment cake. the use of public transport has not returned to pre—pandemic levels. passenger number forecasts for the next few years have been lowered, but transport for london insists this line is still needed. this railway isn't built for today or tomorrow, it's built for the next 100 to 150 years, and we are very confident that this is a catalyst now for the post—pandemic recovery. there was a celebratory atmosphere as the new railway arrived with a promise to transform railway travel across london and give the uk economy a £42 billion boost. it is unclear when something like this might get built again. katy austin, bbc news. i'm ros atkins with outside source. we are here, as we always are, in
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the bbc news room. downing street staff say during the pandemic, like nonparties were —— lockdown parties were common there. a huge collection of data linked to china's treatment of uyghurs and other minorities has been handed to the bbc. the invasion of ukraine has led to steep rises in global food prices particularly grain. and that has raised the prospect of famine in the countries which depend on it. let's look at this issue in depth. the west accuses russia of using food as a weapon of war. we are witnessing how russia is weapon icing its energy supplies. unfortunately, we are seeing the same pattern emerging in food security —— weapon icing. that's the eu. the us agrees. food supplies for millions of ukrainians and millions more around
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the world _ ukrainians and millions more around the world has quite literally been held hostage by the russian military. russia denies this. but there's no denying that the war is affecting food supplies. we expected that ukraine will export about _ we expected that ukraine will export about £70 _ we expected that ukraine will export about £70 million, _ we expected that ukraine will export about £70 million, but _ we expected that ukraine will export about £70 million, but unfortunatelyj about £70 million, but unfortunately the russian — about £70 million, but unfortunately the russian invasion— about £70 million, but unfortunately the russian invasionjust _ about £70 million, but unfortunately the russian invasionjust blocks- about £70 million, but unfortunately the russian invasionjust blocks ourl the russian invasionjust blocks our ports _ ukraine's ports are on the black sea and the azov sea. the biggest of them is odesa. normally, odesa would export vast quantities of food, in particular wheat. ukraine produces 10% of global wheat exports. but millions of tonnes of grain are now stuck. and there's more coming. we are facing a disaster that's going to happen in the next few weeks, when the new crop is here and the old crop is not exported. the old crop is stuck. there's no space for the new crop. and this is the consequence. it's the countries that can least afford — it's the countries that can least afford it— it's the countries that can least afford it that are hardest hit. so there's— afford it that are hardest hit. so there's a — afford it that are hardest hit. so there's a number of african countries, and egypt is one of those, — countries, and egypt is one of those, who are being really hit by the inability to get weed out of
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ukraine — the inability to get weed out of ukraine. —— get wheat out of ukraine _ egypt is one. somalia is another. it gets more than 60% of its grain from ukraine and russia. and pressure on supply also brings pressure on cost. global food prices were already rising after covid. now russia's invasion has pushed them to record highs. and according to the polish prime minister, this worldwide impact is quite deliberate. stalin has done this in ukraine in 1933 already. _ stalin has done this in ukraine in 1933 already, so _ stalin has done this in ukraine in 1933 already, so it _ stalin has done this in ukraine in 1933 already, so it is— stalin has done this in ukraine in 1933 already, so it is kind - stalin has done this in ukraine in 1933 already, so it is kind of- 1933 already, so it is kind of tradition— 1933 already, so it is kind of tradition for— 1933 already, so it is kind of tradition for russia - 1933 already, so it is kind of tradition for russia to - make a weapon of wheat and crops. russia denies this and, as you'll hear, it blames ukraine. but ukraine has used the mines to protect odesa from a russian attack. and now ukraine is also looking at this idea to restart exports.
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we need their assistance, our partners, international partners, to secure our seaports. they need to, from a defence point of view, find a way to build a corridor. this idea of a corridor was discussed by the uk and lithuania. but there remain a number of obstacles to this happening. it may also involve warships protecting the convoy, with all the potential complications that could bring. and while that's thrashed out, one other alternative is ports on the river danube and railways too. we know some grain is getting out, but a fraction of normal exports. and the un's language is increasingly stark about what all of this means.
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it says ukraine produces enough food for 400 million people and that this could come next. if we don't open those ports, you're talking _ if we don't open those ports, you're talking about a declaration of war on global— talking about a declaration of war on global food security. it will have — on global food security. it will have extraordinary consequences. we are already— have extraordinary consequences. we are already facing the worst food crisis _ are already facing the worst food crisis since — are already facing the worst food crisis since world war ii. and we are looking — crisis since world war ii. and we are looking at a hell storm on earth — and so just as covid did before, russia's war in ukraine is placing huge strain on the globalised supply chains that provide the fundamentals of our lives. first this war impacted the world's energy supplies — now its food too. let's pick up on that idea we were talking about, as one way of ending the blockade, some type of coalition of the willing which could create a corridor which would allow exports to resume from ukrainian ports. it could involve warships in the black sea. let's see if that is in any way
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practical. i'm joined by ryan ramsey, former captain of royal navy nuclear power submarine. thank you forjoining us. as you listen to me detail the possibility of a corridor, do you thicket ascending that is possible and advisable? i5 ascending that is possible and advisable?— ascending that is possible and advisable?_ --| ascending that is possible and i advisable?_ -- you advisable? is it possible? -- you think it is — advisable? is it possible? -- you think it is something? _ advisable? is it possible? -- you think it is something? anything i advisable? is it possible? -- you | think it is something? anything is ossible, think it is something? anything is possible. but _ think it is something? anything is possible, but i'm _ think it is something? anything is possible, but i'm not _ think it is something? anything is possible, but i'm not sure - think it is something? anything is possible, but i'm not sure at i think it is something? anything is possible, but i'm not sure at this| possible, but i'm not sure at this stage it is advisable. there isjust too much risk to be able to achieve that. ~ , ., ,. ~' too much risk to be able to achieve that. ~ , ., ,., ~ , too much risk to be able to achieve that. . , ., y., 4' , that. why do you think there is too much risk? — that. why do you think there is too much risk? if— that. why do you think there is too much risk? if you _ that. why do you think there is too much risk? if you look _ that. why do you think there is too much risk? if you look back- much risk? if you look back to february. _ much risk? if you look back to february. the _ much risk? if you look back to february, the montreal i much risk? if you look back to i february, the montreal convention which allows access to the black sea, that was closed to warships and i was at the request of president zelensky. the second thing is the risk of an inadvertent interaction between russian ships and native warships for british warships, whichever warships they intend to use, could be absolutely catastrophic and basically as late this further. and probably the third one is the mining issue. at the moment, there are three navigation
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warnings in place, one is about the fact there is a war going on and another two about mining. i don't know how command and control of where the mines are, of the ukrainians and or even the russians, so there's significant risk you have significant safe passage for those merchant vessels, and that's a huge challenge to be able to achieve in a short period of time.— short period of time. forgive me if this is a naive _ short period of time. forgive me if this is a naive question _ short period of time. forgive me if this is a naive question - - short period of time. forgive me if this is a naive question - with i short period of time. forgive me if this is a naive question - with the | this is a naive question — with the ukrainians not know where their minds are?— ukrainians not know where their minds are? ., ., .,, ,., , minds are? you would hope so, but it de-ends minds are? you would hope so, but it depends on — minds are? you would hope so, but it depends on what type _ minds are? you would hope so, but it depends on what type of _ minds are? you would hope so, but it depends on what type of minds i depends on what type of minds they've been using, and if they drift or otherwise. the area they have declared is a large area. find have declared is a large area. and what about _ have declared is a large area. and what about the _ have declared is a large area. and what about the idea of these ships coming not from nato member states but a member that has an interest in having the screen exported to the one that is more palatable to the russians, would that work? that
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would be a _ russians, would that work? that would be a more _ russians, would that work? twat would be a more palatable solution, and it is whether those nations would want to take the risk in order to do that from either inadvertent escalation by interaction with the russians or the risk of mines to the warships. russians or the risk of mines to the warshi s. . ,. , , russians or the risk of mines to the warshi s. ., y., , , , ., warships. can you help us understand this agreement _ warships. can you help us understand this agreement in _ warships. can you help us understand this agreement in place _ warships. can you help us understand this agreement in place to _ warships. can you help us understand this agreement in place to not i warships. can you help us understand this agreement in place to not see i this agreement in place to not see warships entering the black sea? how did that come about and which countries control whether that can be flexed in some way? 50. countries control whether that can be flexed in some way?— be flexed in some way? so, the detail of the _ be flexed in some way? so, the detail of the convention, i be flexed in some way? so, the detail of the convention, it's i detail of the convention, it's managed effectively by the un and also controlled by turkey. the issue is, the russians have not been paying attention to it anyway and moved five warships through, so in reality, that would play a lesser part in what's enabled warships to go into the black sea. find part in what's enabled warships to go into the black sea.— part in what's enabled warships to go into the black sea. and one more ruestion, go into the black sea. and one more question. again. _ go into the black sea. and one more question, again, this _ go into the black sea. and one more question, again, this may _
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go into the black sea. and one more question, again, this may be - go into the black sea. and one more question, again, this may be naive. l question, again, this may be naive. would not be possible for a part of the black sea to be treated as a safe zone for exports while the rest of it is still considered a life military environment? yeah, that's a com - lete military environment? yeah, that's a complete possibility. _ military environment? yeah, that's a complete possibility. if— military environment? yeah, that's a complete possibility. if you - military environment? yeah, that's a complete possibility. if you look i military environment? yeah, that's a complete possibility. if you look at i complete possibility. if you look at the black sea, there are other nations that are continuing to move trade through there, so few —— towns towards bulgaria, and if you look at tracking at the moment, there are merchant vessels moving in and out, so that is the most possible outcome, to move grain from there. �* , , .,_ possible outcome, to move grain from there. , , ._ there. and presumably, finally, r an, there. and presumably, finally, ryan. one _ there. and presumably, finally, ryan. one of — there. and presumably, finally, ryan, one of the _ there. and presumably, finally, ryan, one of the challenges i there. and presumably, finally, | ryan, one of the challenges here there. and presumably, finally, i ryan, one of the challenges here is that russia is not sticking to agreed international rules in a range of ways in this conflict, and so any agreement put in place for a corridor would not be particularly reassuring?— corridor would not be particularly reassurin. ? �* , , ., ., , reassuring? absolutely, and i was similar during _ reassuring? absolutely, and i was similar during the _ reassuring? absolutely, and i was similar during the wars _ reassuring? absolutely, and i was similar during the wars from i reassuring? absolutely, and i was similar during the wars from the i similar during the wars from the
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19805. both similar during the wars from the 1980s. both the iraqis and iranians did not stick to what they agreed. and putin done --... it ——... it isa ——... it is a man not in control of what is going happen when. --... it is a man not in control of what is going happen when. ryan, thank ou what is going happen when. ryan, thank you for— what is going happen when. ryan, thank you for that, _ what is going happen when. ryan, thank you for that, that _ what is going happen when. ryan, thank you for that, that was i what is going happen when. ryan, thank you for that, that was ryan | thank you for that, that was ryan ramsey. before we wrap up this hour of outside source, breaking news from the world of football. the pre—leak has agreed a takeover of chelsea football club by a consortium, led by a co—owner of the la dodgers, todd boehly. in a statement, the premier league say... —— the premier league... if it goes through, it will put an end to the ribbon abramovich era, which has stretched 19 years. this is a significant step to that happening, but as the premier league
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emphasises, it is not a done deal yet, so we will continue to track that story. thank you forjoining us on outside source. hello there. we saw plenty of showers today, some of them more heavy with hail and thunder, particularly across parts of england and wales. but the shower activity is easing down now. in fact, many places will be drier overnight, but we've got more rain pushing into northern and western areas thanks to a new frontal system you can see behind me making inroads off the atlantic. it'll start to bring some wetter, windier weather to western scotland, northern ireland, western england and wales by the end of the night. it'll be dry, though, with clearer spells further east. so under the clearer spells, we could see temperatures dipping into single digits, but further west, generally, where we have the cloud, the wind and the rain, it'll be pretty mild. so this weather front will continue to push its way eastwards across the country on wednesday, weakening as it does so. more isobars on the charts tomorrow, so it means it's going to be a windy day pretty much across the board, but very windy across the north and west of scotland.
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but the front will be fizzling out as it pushes south eastwards, but behind it, it'll brighten up, plenty of sunshine around, but further blustery showers, most of them in the north and west of scotland. temperatures range from the mid to high teens. factor in the wind, though, it might not feel as mild as that. as we head through wednesday night, it'll be turning a little bit drier and clear once again thanks to another ridge of high pressure, but another feature will be pushing into western areas, bringing some wet weather to northern ireland by the end of the night. temperatures, single digits in the north, double figures across the south. we got low pressure to the north of the uk, higher pressure to the south for thursday. this little feature running through central areas will bring outbreaks of showery rain. that'll be pushing across the irish sea, into northern and central england, into wales, eventually clearing away, but there will be, i think, quite a bit of cloud around generally for england and wales on thursday, a few showers here and there. brighterfurther north, sunshine and showers across scotland. temperatures mid teens in the north. we could see 19 or 20 in the south. now, for friday, high
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pressure in the south starts to push northwards. that'll settle things down, but still the northeast of the country, especially much of northern scotland, will be windy with further blustery showers here, a few sunny spells. but elsewhere, northern ireland, most of england and wales will be drier on friday, increasing amounts of sunshine, so it'll feel a bit warmer, i think. high teens, low 20s here, but mid teens further north and feeling cooler because of the wind. into the weekend, high continues to bring a lot of dry —— into the weekend, high pressure continues to bring a lot of dry and settled weather around, quite a bit of sunshine, but we start to pick up our winds from a more northerly direction, so that means it'll start to feel cool in the north and east.
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this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm... insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street were routine as pictures emerge of the prime minister with alcohol at an event during lockdown. he wasn't there saying, "this shouldn't be happening." he wasn't saying, "can everyone break up and go home? can everyone socially distance, can everyone put masks on?" no, he wasn't telling anybody that. he was grabbing a glass for himself. the prime minister's official spokesman says that borisjohnson takes revelations about what happened in downing street during lockdown "very seriously." a man has beenjailed for 24 years for the murder of three—year—old kemarni watson darby, who suffered more than 20 fractures to his ribs over weeks of beatings. the energy regulator ofgem says the price cap is expected to reach £2,800 this october — that's an increase of more than £800 on the current cap.

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